ACHIEVING A MORE EFFICIENT CONTACT SURFACE BETWEEN A BLOCK BONE AND RECIPIENT AREA USING A 3D STEREOLITHOGRAPHY (SLA) MODEL OF A JAW FRAGMENT IN ADJUSTING A HUMAN BONE BLOCK TO THE RESIPIENT AREA AND TIME SAVING DURING OPERATION
by Huseynli Rufat (Azerbaijan)

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Classification: Treatment, Hard Tissue Regeneration, General aspects, Guided bone regeneration (GBR), Events, Symposia / Congresses
Content
Objectives: Autogenic and allogenic bone block materials of different companies are increasingly used in guided bone regeneration (GBR) procedures. Adjusting block-shaped allogenic transplants to fit the recipient area is time consuming and technically challenging. A method of bone block formation using a 3-D stereolithography (SLA) model is reported here.
Methods: A tomographic image of the area for augmentation was obtained and edited using Implant Assistant. Data from the image of the prepared 3-D jaw model were transferred to a 3-D printer (Objet Stratasys to produce a model of the jaw fragment. Unicortical cancellous block (Maxgrapht cortico-spongiosa) was moulded onto the model and holes for fixation screws were drilled into the material. The bone block was added to a 100-grams syringe filled with serum, emptied out in to a container and refilled. This procedure was repeated several times. After raising a flap, the recipient area was decorticated and the prepared block put in place. The edges were shaped by adding natural bovine bone graft (Cerobone) material and the surface was covered with native pericardium membrane (Jason membrane). A platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) membrane was then applied and the soft tissues sutured without strain to avoid flap tension.
Results: After 6 months, the augmented area was re-operated for implant placement. Integration was observed between the bone block and recipient tissue after raising the flap. The volume of jaw atrophied bone had increased as a result of augmentation. There was adequate vascularisation of the transplanted bone block, which was integrated into the tissue of the recipient area. Bone resorption in the form of a thin fissure was observed in the external cortical layer, close to the alveolar crest of the block. Nevertheless, the growth in alveolar crest volume was deemed adequate for implant placement. A temporary crown was fixed immediately after placement because there was adequate stability, and alveolar crest defect was re-grafted with Cerabone and covered with Jason membrane before the flap was closed. After 4 months, an image was taken that showed bone augmentation and osseointegration around the implant.
Conclusions: Preparing a jaw bone fragment as an allogenic bone block using an SLA model done successfully in GBR-type surgeries. The method allows block bone to be adapted for the recipient area, and is associated with significant time savings. Post-operative tomographic scans confirm augmentation of the alveolar ridge, making this a promising way for restoring aesthetics in the frontal area.
Details
Osteology Foundation
Content Type:
Poster
Publication date:
01/01/1970
Publisher:
Osteology Foundation